“Mar dos barcos” by Allison Carvalho & Cristina Nascimento (2016)

  October 20th, 2016


     I’d like to share with you Brazilian duo Allison Carvalho and Cristina Nascimento playing the song “Mar dos barcos” by Cristina Nascimento:

       Allison Carvalho & Cristina Nascimento, “Mar dos barcos”, 2016

     I have a hard time counting all the ways this song enchants me. I also have a hard time parsing out its many merits — but only because its virtues all cohere and intermingle so gracefully in this composition and its presentation, become an unparsable unity: the effortless fusion of the vocals, the inter-braiding guitar harmonies, the way in which the supple instrumental passages flow into and out of the sung sections, the breathy close and its trickling, uncertain trail-out guitar figure. Four minutes of such sweet repose. Four minutes that feel like they could go on without rest, without shore, track of time happily lost.
     Perhaps I love this song most of all for how it mixes mourning and gentle sorrow with that sway of waves befitting its title (“Mar dos barcos” = “Sea, two boats”). I am so enamored of this mixture of emotions characteristic of certain Brazilian music — especially Bossa Nova. I’ve always found in this a great spiritual-emotional reconciliation. 


For more music by Carvalho and Nascimento, please check out Carvalho’s youtube channel here.

[Posted by C Way on October 20, 2016]


[file under: ABOUT ART ||| Music ]

Song: C. Way – “Lagrimas Negras” (Trio Matamoros Cover, 1929)

  April 24th, 2016

     Here’s my take on a beautiful, legendary tune, “Lágrimas Negras,” composed in 1929 by Miguel Matamoros of the Cuban group Trío Matamoros. The Trío Matamoros composed and performed Cuban Son and Boleros (two Cuban styles of music & dance) from 1925-1969, achieving international fame, touring not only in their native Cuba, but also Europe, and eventually recording in New York. I love their rhythms and compositions, and hold them in high regard; they remind me of another famous Latin American trio, Los Panchos
     My grandmother loves this song, she turned 92 recently. For her birthday, I presented her with this tune. My interpretation is directly copied from this 1931 recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-HNOcWWzLg. It’s rough & lo-fi, but the spirit and urgency are there. Enjoy!:

Also, check out this alternate version, which I liked some, and is cleaner, but which doesn’t seem to have as much soul as the rougher version presented above:

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Also, check out my records “Needle Out” and “Some Songs, Vol.1″ on iTunes

And as always, buy CDs direct from me here

My main music page is here

[Posted by C Way on April 24, 2016]


[file under: Music ||| MY MUSIC ]

On J. Krishnamurti’s Brockwood Park Seminars, 1979 (Part 1 of 2)

  November 8th, 2015

    Jiddu Krishnamurti (b.1895 – 1986) was a philosopher, author and public speaker. He traveled the world and held seminars and discussions regarding his teachings, presiding over groups large and small. I’m still getting a sense of his teachings as a coherent body, but as of this writing I think I can summarize at least some of his worldview and major concerns as follows: a) to realize peace and to attain freedom from suffering for him/herself and for the world, a human being must focus first on improving his or her internal psychological processes; b) an important aspect of this is to observe with total freedom: to examine the self and the world outside the self as free from emotion, bias, and prejudice as possible; c) this kind of observation can help one realize the inseparability of self and World, which itself is a necessary realization for human betterment and advancement; d) all of this, and Krishnamurti’s other teachings, occur outside of established creeds, religions or spiritualities.
    Another way to summarize his philosophy, in his own words: Truth can only be found “through the mirror of relationship, through the understanding of the contents of his own mind, through observation and not through intellectual analysis or introspective dissection.” And that observation, in its most unbiased form, is Freedom: “Freedom is pure observation without direction, without fear of punishment and reward. Freedom is without motive; freedom is not at the end of the evolution of man but lies in the first step of his existence.” Krishnamurti wrote very little, believing the kinds of insights he promoted could best come to humankind through the immediacy of discussion, but in 1980 his biographer asked him to summarize some of the main tenets of his thinking; both of the quotes above come from this summary, called “The Core of the Teaching”.
    I stumbled across Krishnamurti’s teachings in the last few months, and have been working through audio transcriptions of the “Brockwood Park Seminars”, a series of six seminars given in 1979 and which attempted to systematically wrestle with the question: “What is one to do with the increasing violence in the world?”. By all accounts these seminars summarize Krishnamurti’s teachings fairly well, which is why I chose them as a primer. They are available in the audio section of the online repository of his teachings, found here. Each seminar’s about an hour and twenty minutes.
    Now I don’t know who the Brockwood attendees were, and I don’t know the context of these talks (who funded them, how much did it cost to go, were they open to the general public, what is the relationship between the speaker and Brockwood, etc.). But what I do know is that I’ve found the seminars I’ve heard so far to be very compelling opportunities to sit in on charged, unfolding dialectic between a rigorous and passionate thinker and his active, sometimes contentious, sometimes stubborn audience. People during these seminars question Krishnamurti openly (as they should), struggle with concepts, go on tangents, exasperate the speaker. Sometimes this says something about Krishnamurti’s method — he’s going into this with what feels like a clear step-by-step progression that he’s trying to impose on his audience — and sometimes this says something about the difficult and at times revolutionary (intellectually, spiritually) content of his material. Sometimes this just suggests that any attempt to discover, rattle and then modify one’s core assumptions, in a live setting, with other intelligent humans, is going to be fraught, full of false starts, relapses, collapses, etc.
    Listening to these seminars has convinced me that a live participatory forum is maybe one of the most invigorating means to not just convey philosophical teachings but enact actual thought and spirit-change. Which is perhaps why you find it repeatedly (though not often enough, to my tastes) in the literature, from Plato to Hume to Wittgenstein. The back-and-forth, the slow building of concepts, the interplay, the suggestion of thought being born right there, of being arrived at, not pre-codified and merely set down as law, stimulates the mind to better accept challenging notions.    [CLICK TO READ MORE . . .]

[Posted by C Way on November 8, 2015]


[file under: Non-fiction & Essays ]

The Peeper Bee (by C. Way)

  October 20th, 2015

    I made a book for my daughter the other month for her third birthday using construction paper, super-glue, staples for the binding, and all sorts of colored ink pens. Here ’tis if you wanna check it out, and some sample pages below!

[Posted by C Way on October 20, 2015]

1 Comment

[file under: ABOUT ART ||| MY ART ||| paintings/drawings ||| Visual Arts ]

Aneurythms: A Meditation

  October 3rd, 2015



     What if everyone lived as if they had some deeply-lodged bodily defect just as likely to be harmless over the course of a life as it was to be instantaneously deadly? Some aneurysm (think of the character Nathan in TV’s “Six Feet Under”), some blood clot, some little knot of physiological catastrophe waiting to unravel (or not) on its own schedule, heedless of whatever our daily efforts to count calories, reduce stress, eat organic, exercise daily?
     What if, moreover, this lurking depth charge couldn’t be detected? Was immune to X-rays, sonograms, CT-scans — just shifted around somehow, like a particle escaping a clear read, Heisenberg-like, eluding us because of our very efforts to find it?
     Some of us might sink into despair. Our will and motivation depleted, our outlook blackened by fatalism, rage. We might become paralyzed by depression and nihilism, unable to do much else but wait, seething, for the end.
     Some of us might fling ourselves into hedonism. Canvas the riches and delights of the senses for experiences we haven’t yet tasted, & which we might as well dive headlong into: gluttony, orgies, life-savings-burning gambling binges a la the 1995 film “Leaving Las Vegas”, sustained benders of alcohol and drugs. Or we might pursue milder, less decadent versions of this strategy: bucket-list tours of the wonders of the world, or surveys of thrilly experiences we’ve always been too timid to try: skydiving, mountain-climbing, bungee-jumping, the like.
     Some us might change nothing. Realizing there’s nothing to be gained from worrying — nothing we can do to locate, and therefore nullify the possible threat — some of us might just carry on as we were. Living our lives in our own unique fingerprint blend of vice, virtue, meanness, kindness, selflessness, selfishness.
     And some of us might change much more than our, say, reluctance to indulge in habits of the sensuous, or our lifelong fear of scaling a sheer cliff-face (not that there’s anything with either of those decisions, mind you). Some of us might decide to scale much steeper cliff faces, dive down from much loftier heights and with much flimsier parachutes: some of us might decide to change our souls.
     Some of us might decide that we want to have one and only one sensation when that final moment comes: peace and love. That we want one and only one thought: “I tried hard to rise above what I was given, I did some good. I gave more to the world than I took.” And that we have to change whatever we can in ourselves to ensure that this comes to pass.
     What peace? The peace of the spirit at ease with itself, integrated.
     What love? Love for the universe from which it was formed, love for the universe into which it is set to dissolve.
     What was given? A flawed body, mind and spirit (as they all are). Molded by flawed environment, by flawed parents (as they all are).
     How to rise above? Acts of selflessness, acts of kindness, unflinching awareness of one’s errors and maladjustments, some congenital and some learned, ceaseless struggle with oneself to act in love toward all creation, including oneself.
     What was taken from the world? Air to breathe. Shelter in which to sleep. Food to eat. Chance after chance when mistakes were made. A brain, a body, a spirit healthy and developed enough to set the foundation for survival, success, pleasure, contentment. Love, support and tenderness from family, friends, lovers. The chance live in a country and under a government that creates the conditions for flourishing, when so many on this planet do not.
     And what was given back? One’s expression of one’s truest self — as entertainer, mother, father, lover, artist, builder, laborer, healer, soldier, cook, gardener, philanthropist, ruler, teacher, priest — delivered from the largest stage to which we can aspire, and to the greatest swath of creation we can reach, be it plant, animal or human — in love. Put another way: the gift given back could be one’s own self entire, healed, integrated, fulfilled.
All writing © copyright C. Way / Snailcrow.com 2015

[Posted by C Way on October 3, 2015]


[file under: Misc ||| Non-fiction & Essays ||| OTHER WRITING ]