Abandoned Storage Unit No. 4: Coal Bin, Bou Saada, Charles Bradley, Mollusco-baby

  June 23rd, 2014

 
 
 
     Hello readers. As usual with the Abandoned Storage Unit format, I present to you a fat clutch of subject matter – most of it arts-related, as usual. Don’t know what I’m talking about? For prior examples of this kind of post, see here and here.
 
     So, lots on the docket today. Let’s start with this friend from Etsy vendor BeatUpCreations:
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
     Naturally I am most drawn to this anthropo-molluscan mixed-up critter. If it had crow wings I’d probably custom order two dozen. I like its one bent antenna, it’s widow’s peak of gold candyshell, and its chipped up face. He is not happy, he is not upset. He is not for eating. He does not respond to salt. He is just a scuffed, dirty snailchild, let him wriggle and explore. He has the power to dissolve stone & most metals with his slime. He is telepathic. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                            ***** 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eric Sloane
 
 

       Eric Sloane (b.1905 in NYC, d. 1985)
          Corn Bin, date unknown, Oil on Masonite

 
 
 
 
 
      This is “Corn Bin” by American artist Eric Sloane. The glimpsed corn aglow & about to be revealed like a treasure chest slightly ajar. Like a beautiful grin just beginning. Beams cross posts cross slats cross floor cross the glorious portals of morning. A bin of pure reaped corn. The glorious morning firing it radiant. The earth’s bounty. The sweet ripe earth’s bounty washed in glorious light from the white portals of morning. Sweet ripe gold sparking out of the dark interior lit only by two white portals. This is a silent place. No human has to be present to witness and thereby validate. The universe alone can revel in the austere majesty of its own construction. 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                            ***** 
 
 
 
 
Rigolot
 
 

       Albert Gabriel Rigolot (1862 – 1932)
          Les Petites Filles de Bou Saada, date unknown, oil on canvas

 
 
 
 
 
      This is “Les petites filles de Bou Saada” (“The pretty girls of Bou Saada”) by French artist Albert Gabriel Rigolot. Bou Saada (which means “place of happiness”) is an Algerian oasis town that has historically been an important trading center & marketplace.
     I love this painting. The composition is mesmerizing, with its neat tetris interlock of L-shaped whitespace below and roughly tesselated L counterpart of dark above. The grate and glimpse of sky in the top right prevent the diagonal symmetry from being too neat. Rough jumbled stairs slope up to the watching girls. Hay or straw or something like it tufts over some gap in the wood-ceiling. What does the rough lumpy stone wall in the foreground conceal or contain? A fine rusty dust on the rockheap-stairs spills down & transfers the color from the girls’ faces and garments, finding echo in the orange straw/refuse in the top left. This painting transports you: to shuffling dust, cries from the marketplace, bustle of livestock, and the sudden sense of having trespassed in this peculiar slumping interzone. A masterwork of beguiling mystery and compositional harmony.
 
 
 
 
                                                                                            ***** 
 
 
 
 
Charles Bradley
 
 
 
 
 
     I saw Charles Bradley headline the House of Vans show in Brooklyn on a delicious cusp-of-summer nite in June. After strong instrumental opening numbers by the airtight Menahan street band, & after some expert crowdwork by the MC (doubling as organist), Mr. Bradley emerged, resplendent in his sequined, monogrammed hot cherry red on red on red ensemble. Colors of blood & passion, befitting his MC’s introduction of him as the Victim of Love. There he stood by turns coy & overcome with emotion, smiling graciously to the waves of applause from his hometown crowd, wide eyed, arms wide, then hamming it up for the crowd with a salacious finger-lick. The band took it from there, snapping into place & Mr. Bradley proceeded to sing the night to flaming shreds. From the first few bars you could tell that the man had the pain of a lifetime stored up in him, and a scorching, raspy scream to match it.
 
 
 

 
       Charles Bradley, Brooklyn, House of Vans show
         from unARTigNYC, June 12, 2014

 
 
      Goddamn. I hadn’t heard a note of the man until that night, & I just stood there in beery disbelief, jammed up about one row from the front. Only a couple of teenagers and the photog’s row were closer. I didn’t have my earplugs in and I both regretted it and thanked myself for my good subconscious planning every time he pulled back to annihilate the microphone. Lord how he worked it; everything was white-hot commitment. He fell to his knees, mic stand over his back like Jesus & his cross. He pulled James Brown moves on his mic stand, flinging it forward and yanking it back, startling one of the photographers. He hip-gyrated and tried splits. He worked odd tai chi maneuvers & fluttery-armed backpedals. He mugged and finger-licked and lewdly grinned. He let it all out for us in a way I haven’t seen a performer do in years. His face streamed sweat as he grimaced in the grip of those impassioned songs as if he had just instants ago discovered their melody and message.
      Bradley ended his set by coming down to the front row, with some assistance from security, where he was rapidly mobbed, held, embraced by those of us lucky enough to be close by. I patted him & held his damp head & felt vast thanks. Greil Marcus once said of the music of Chester Burnett, aka Howlin Wolf: “This is where the soul of man never dies.” On June 12 2014, in a packed warehoused crowd full of twenty somethings cheering for music of a bygone generation, I saw another spark from that great universal soul Marcus saw in the Wolf. & my my my how bright it shone.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

MORE INFO:

For more information about Eric Sloane, please check out his site here.

For more about Albert Gabriel Rigolot, please check out this online gallery at Rehs Galleries, Inc..

For more information about Charles Bradely, please check out this indispensable 6-part interview series sensitively conducted by FaceCulture.

[posted by C Way at 7:20 PM]

2 Comments

[file under: ABANDONED STORAGE UNITS ||| Ekphrasis ||| Music ||| paintings/drawings ||| sculpture ||| Visual Arts ]


Comments (2) To “Abandoned Storage Unit No. 4: Coal Bin, Bou Saada, Charles Bradley, Mollusco-baby”

  1. Jess Barnett said:

    Corn Bin. Wow. Some wonderful choices here.


  2. SnailCrow said:

    Thanks Jess! I wish I had a better/larger image of “Corn Bin”, but couldn’t find one.


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